Vocate Blog

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

This article is part of our series “Vocate’s Wall of Fame”. Each person described in the series is someone who has inspired the Vocate team and who we believe represents what “unlocking human potential” means. Quite literally, the Wall of Fame exists in our office (printed out images framed on the wall) and every week we vote on a new honoree.

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was a prominent leader of the Indian independence movement. Growing up in India, Gandhi developed a passion for standing against civil unjust. He eventually assumed leadership and formed the Indian National Congress to advocate nonviolent protests to achieve peace and equality. Over his lifetime, Gandhi lead many monumental protests and strikes. However, The Salt March, was the most famous.
 
In the 1930’s, the British implemented a major tariff on salt, prohibiting Indians from selling or gathering salt, which is a large part of the Indian diet. In response, Gandhi organized The Salt March, a 240-mile walk to the Arabian Sea to collect salt. Thousands of protesters gathered to march with Gandhi, creating an empowering message. Soon after, word of Gandhi’s work had traveled around the world, grabbing everyone’s attention. He was named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” for the 1930’s issue, honoring him and his determination.
 
Despite all his efforts, Gandhi was still arrested many times for speaking out on the British empire. He eventually retired to New Delhi, where he attended small prayer gatherings. In January of 1948, on his way to a pray meeting, Gandhi was assassinated by a Hindu activist. Gandhi will always be remembered as a great inspiration through his determination and strength. Gandhi was called “Mahatma” by many, meaning great soul, which he will continue to be known as.

For more information, follow this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahatma_Gandhi

To learn more about the Gandhi Institute, follow this link: http://www.gandhiinstitute.org/

Molly Young

High Point University '19

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